I am an avid reader and love, more than anything, to recommend books to others and engage in literary discussions. I'm not picky about what I read-- I love mysteries, classic fiction, historical fiction, non-fiction, and especially stories that are entertaining but relate to my love of science and medicine.

This blog will mostly feature book reviews- I don't know how great I am at critiquing though, because it is rare that I don't enjoy something. Each piece of writing seems to have something to redeem it, something it can teach us.


"I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library."
- Jorge Luis Borges, "Poema de los Dones"

 

me: *owns 264 unread books*

me: *buys 17 new books*

me: *rereads harry potter*

These tiny scorpions would like to perform an important inspection of your old book collection, please | Running Ponies, Scientific American Blog Network

I’ve never heard of these book scorpions before, but they have book lungs (like some arachnids) and like book things so I’m putting this on here. Science lesson for the day! Nerd out.

rosalindrobertson:

renirabbit:

readmore-worryless:

huffpostbooks:

What’s Your Book Shelfie Style?

Not pictured: BOXES

i always do it by size

cripes, there are “systems” to do this? Not just “wherever”?

I categorize mine by genre mostly, some personal significance in terms of grouping favorites and TBR books.

Look what I stumbled upon on my walk! A mini library. I’ve only ever seen pictures of these on Tumblr, so this just made my night.

a-kind-of-library:

REVIEW: The Girl in the Roadby Monica Byrne
The Girl in the Road was a debut novel I had been anxious to read. Now that I have, my feelings are mixed.
 The book follows two female narrators, each with their own tale to tell. Their stories are set in different times, one in the present and one in the past, yet each journey has elements that parallel the other and offer seamless transitions between the two perspectives.
Readers first meet Meena in adrenaline-filled introductory pages. She’s fleeing India, wounded and alone, haunted by shadowy, unidentified threats. Meena has heard of The Trail, a new-tech bridge crossing the Arabian Sea that harvests energy, and decides to cross it to Ethiopia—returning to the country she was born in. Traveling the bridge is illegal, highly difficult, but the crossing forces Meena to face challenges along the way and within herself.
Mariama, our second protagonist, is a child who also heads toward Ethopia after a traumatic experience, tagging along with strangers who have taken it upon themselves to be her guardians. Her experience is limited to the sheltered life she had as a slave in a wealthy home, so her months-long journey across Saharan Africa opens her world quickly and dramatically.
Both of these journey stories are very much told in the moment—as if you were in their head the minute they decided to undertake these journeys, but with little context as to what spurred their actions. It’s not immediately apparent what these characters are leaving behind or what they hope to find at their destination. Details about the past slowly unfold, sometimes at a glacial pace.
The pacing was inconsistent—while the beginning moved quickly and hooked me as a reader, other times felt incredibly slow. Meena’s “present” was set in the vague future, about 30-40 years from 2014. Enough in the future that the technologies referenced were unfamiliar and seemed more sophisticated than we have today.
Also, I know very little about Indian and African culture, making all the cultural references difficult to grasp—I never knew if the characterizations were true to the country or represented this fictional futuristic time period. More context on that front would have been nice.
Overall I would recommend this book, but I wouldn’t read it a second time.***I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review.***

a-kind-of-library:

REVIEW: The Girl in the Road
by Monica Byrne

The Girl in the Road was a debut novel I had been anxious to read. Now that I have, my feelings are mixed.

 The book follows two female narrators, each with their own tale to tell. Their stories are set in different times, one in the present and one in the past, yet each journey has elements that parallel the other and offer seamless transitions between the two perspectives.

Readers first meet Meena in adrenaline-filled introductory pages. She’s fleeing India, wounded and alone, haunted by shadowy, unidentified threats. Meena has heard of The Trail, a new-tech bridge crossing the Arabian Sea that harvests energy, and decides to cross it to Ethiopia—returning to the country she was born in. Traveling the bridge is illegal, highly difficult, but the crossing forces Meena to face challenges along the way and within herself.

Mariama, our second protagonist, is a child who also heads toward Ethopia after a traumatic experience, tagging along with strangers who have taken it upon themselves to be her guardians. Her experience is limited to the sheltered life she had as a slave in a wealthy home, so her months-long journey across Saharan Africa opens her world quickly and dramatically.

Both of these journey stories are very much told in the moment—as if you were in their head the minute they decided to undertake these journeys, but with little context as to what spurred their actions. It’s not immediately apparent what these characters are leaving behind or what they hope to find at their destination. Details about the past slowly unfold, sometimes at a glacial pace.

The pacing was inconsistent—while the beginning moved quickly and hooked me as a reader, other times felt incredibly slow. Meena’s “present” was set in the vague future, about 30-40 years from 2014. Enough in the future that the technologies referenced were unfamiliar and seemed more sophisticated than we have today.

Also, I know very little about Indian and African culture, making all the cultural references difficult to grasp—I never knew if the characterizations were true to the country or represented this fictional futuristic time period. More context on that front would have been nice.

Overall I would recommend this book, but I wouldn’t read it a second time.

***I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review.***

myimaginarybrooklyn:

{Someone’s prized Nancy Drew collection, proudly on display.}

The series that started it all for me.

myimaginarybrooklyn:

{Someone’s prized Nancy Drew collection, proudly on display.}

The series that started it all for me.

endourse:

do you ever meet someone and you’re like wow I could write a book about you

All the time.

(Source: 97chainz)

Do they sense it, these dead writers, when their books are read? Does a pinprick of light appear in their darkness? Is their soul stirred by the feather touch of another mind reading theirs? I do hope so.

Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale (via bibliophilebunny)

REVIEW: The Girl in the Roadby Monica Byrne
The Girl in the Road was a debut novel I had been anxious to read. Now that I have, my feelings are mixed.
 The book follows two female narrators, each with their own tale to tell. Their stories are set in different times, one in the present and one in the past, yet each journey has elements that parallel the other and offer seamless transitions between the two perspectives.
Readers first meet Meena in adrenaline-filled introductory pages. She’s fleeing India, wounded and alone, haunted by shadowy, unidentified threats. Meena has heard of The Trail, a new-tech bridge crossing the Arabian Sea that harvests energy, and decides to cross it to Ethiopia—returning to the country she was born in. Traveling the bridge is illegal, highly difficult, but the crossing forces Meena to face challenges along the way and within herself.
Mariama, our second protagonist, is a child who also heads toward Ethopia after a traumatic experience, tagging along with strangers who have taken it upon themselves to be her guardians. Her experience is limited to the sheltered life she had as a slave in a wealthy home, so her months-long journey across Saharan Africa opens her world quickly and dramatically.
Both of these journey stories are very much told in the moment—as if you were in their head the minute they decided to undertake these journeys, but with little context as to what spurred their actions. It’s not immediately apparent what these characters are leaving behind or what they hope to find at their destination. Details about the past slowly unfold, sometimes at a glacial pace.
The pacing was inconsistent—while the beginning moved quickly and hooked me as a reader, other times felt incredibly slow. Meena’s “present” was set in the vague future, about 30-40 years from 2014. Enough in the future that the technologies referenced were unfamiliar and seemed more sophisticated than we have today.
Also, I know very little about Indian and African culture, making all the cultural references difficult to grasp—I never knew if the characterizations were true to the country or represented this fictional futuristic time period. More context on that front would have been nice.
Overall I would recommend this book, but I wouldn’t read it a second time.***I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review.***

REVIEW: The Girl in the Road
by Monica Byrne

The Girl in the Road was a debut novel I had been anxious to read. Now that I have, my feelings are mixed.

 The book follows two female narrators, each with their own tale to tell. Their stories are set in different times, one in the present and one in the past, yet each journey has elements that parallel the other and offer seamless transitions between the two perspectives.

Readers first meet Meena in adrenaline-filled introductory pages. She’s fleeing India, wounded and alone, haunted by shadowy, unidentified threats. Meena has heard of The Trail, a new-tech bridge crossing the Arabian Sea that harvests energy, and decides to cross it to Ethiopia—returning to the country she was born in. Traveling the bridge is illegal, highly difficult, but the crossing forces Meena to face challenges along the way and within herself.

Mariama, our second protagonist, is a child who also heads toward Ethopia after a traumatic experience, tagging along with strangers who have taken it upon themselves to be her guardians. Her experience is limited to the sheltered life she had as a slave in a wealthy home, so her months-long journey across Saharan Africa opens her world quickly and dramatically.

Both of these journey stories are very much told in the moment—as if you were in their head the minute they decided to undertake these journeys, but with little context as to what spurred their actions. It’s not immediately apparent what these characters are leaving behind or what they hope to find at their destination. Details about the past slowly unfold, sometimes at a glacial pace.

The pacing was inconsistent—while the beginning moved quickly and hooked me as a reader, other times felt incredibly slow. Meena’s “present” was set in the vague future, about 30-40 years from 2014. Enough in the future that the technologies referenced were unfamiliar and seemed more sophisticated than we have today.

Also, I know very little about Indian and African culture, making all the cultural references difficult to grasp—I never knew if the characterizations were true to the country or represented this fictional futuristic time period. More context on that front would have been nice.

Overall I would recommend this book, but I wouldn’t read it a second time.

***I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review.***